Posts tagged ‘war on Yemen’

August 27, 2019

The Sandal that Slapped the Tank

by mkleit

In December 2018, the fighting Yemeni parties have conducted peace negotiations to pave the way to an end of the brutal war that has torn the country apart, especially with the military intervention of a Saudi-led coalition in favor of one of the parties. The negotiations did some change on the ground, yet in the art of war, the side that imposes its conditions must be the one that has the upper hand, and so far, that’s not the zone the Coalition is in.

The Yemeni military forces have targeted on the 17th of August ARAMCO’s Shaibah oil field and refineries, near the Saudi – Emirati borders, with 10 military drones, which makes it the second time the Yemenis target the strategic depth of the Saudis in the war that has started mid-March 2015.

Yemeni military spokesman, Yehya al Saree’, who goes by the command of the Yemeni government in Sanaa, said that on the morning of the 17th of August, the Yemeni aerial forces have launched its largest attack on Saudi Arabia since the start of the Saudi-led Coalition war on Yemen by targeting Shaibah oil field and refineries with 10 military drones. He promised “bigger and wider military operations on their (Saudis) vital facilities… the coming operations will be more hurtful for the enemy.”

 

Yemeni military spokesman, Yehya al Saree, announcing major attack on Saudi Arabia’s oil refinery in Shaibah

 

This peculiar development isn’t the first of its kind, if we’re speaking of an attack on Saudi Arabia’s vital oil facilities, where the Yemenis have targeted main oil pumps in central Saudi Arabia last May. It has caused some surges in oil prices as well as a change in the tone of Saudi officials and their allies inside Yemen – mainly in southern regions – towards the nature of the war they’re fighting against a Yemeni government located in Sanaa.

The Emirates, the Saudi’s most prominent regional allies in this war, has committed to withdraw its forces from Yemen after a series of attacks on its interests such as oil tankers in Dubai port, military drone operations on Abu Dhabi airport, and its military presence in Aden, south of Yemen. In addition to the international pressure from some governments and rights groups because of alleged war crimes committed against civilians in southern areas, such AP’s report on secret prisons where rape and torture is being practiced on opposers to the Emirati presence in the capitol of the Yemeni south, Aden, supervised by Emirati generals.

Report of Yemeni Army air force targeting Abu Dhabi Airport

 

The Emirati decision has indirectly led to sporadic clashes in Aden between Emirati-supported Southern Transition Council and the pro-Yemeni President Abed Rabbu Mansour Hadi forces, supported by the Saudis. This tension between both sides has shaken the trust among the members of the Coalition, especially with the different goals each party has from the war. For the Saudis, it’s about political control over the Yemenis, and the Emiratis are in it for the ports, especially Aden, Socotra, and Houdeidah, which would act as a vital replacement for the strategic Dubai port considering recent developments in the Persian Gulf and the potential big rivalry that the Chinese-funder Pakistani Gwadar port would create. As for the Hadi government, it’s acting basically as the Saudi’s political puppet to enforce the latter’s control over the country that has always been directly related to the national security of kingdom; while the Transition Council is looking for independence and separation from the Northern part of Yemen, taking he country back to a time before the unification in 1990.

This turbulence, alongside that in the Northern front, would mostly lead the Saudis to one of two options:

  • Conduct direct peace talks with the Sanaa government, especially the Houthis, alongside the revival of the agreements signed in Decemeber’s talks in Stockholm. This would pave the road to an end to the entire war and the sufferings of the millions of Yemenis whom are either displaced, suffering from famine, diseases, malnutrition, and injuries.

Even though the warring parties have signed several agreements that would be a starter in lasting peace process, yet, due to the direct and indirect intervention of many global players in the war, the agreements weren’t fully applied on ground, with the exception of the Houdeidah agreement where the clashes were halted and UN peace-keepers supervised the peace treaty there, in which lies the only port that’s an access for humanitarian aid to more than half of the country’s population.

It’s worth noting that there has been huge international pressure on Saudi Arabia and the UAE to stop the war from governments and International NGOs, and recently there has been a notable statement on the 20th of July by the Saudi Ambassador to the UN, Abdullah al-Muallimi, where he said that “we do not want war with Iran in Yemen or elsewhere… it is high time that the war in Yemen should end and the Houthis should accept UN resolution 2216 by ending their illegitimate occupation of power in Yemen.” This statement could serve as a beacon of light to end this catastrophic war.

 

Heads of both Yemeni delegations, Khaled al-Yamani (left) and Mohamad Abdul-Salam (right), shaking hands, with the presence of UN secretary general Antonion Guterres (center) at the closing of the Yemen peace talks in Stockholm (December 2018)

 

  • The second option would be getting the upper hand in the war over the Sanaa forces and the Houthis, yet it’s easier said than done considering the recent balance-tipping developments, whether it be in Dale’ governorate in the south, just north of Aden, the capitol of the Saudis’ Yemeni allies; as well as, and most notably, the losses the Kingdom is suffering from at the border fronts, where the Saudis have lost several towns and around three cities, clashes going on near other cities, air fields like Abha and Khamis Mousheyt are being constantly hit by military drones and ballistic missiles, and border outposts are being taken over by a few men wearing nothing but slippers and a traditional Yemeni outfit, unlike the Saudi-led coalition which is fully equipped with body armor, night vision scopes, state of the art machine guns, and protected by formidable air and ground forces.

History has taught us that one the hardest battles that any army would fight is against a group that has no fear of death nor does it have anything to lose. The Yemenis have fought 6 wars in the past 30 years, unlike the Saudis, who have entered their first actual war.

In addition to that, the problem that lies in this expectation is that several of the key allies of the Saudis are taking a step back from supporting them, such as the US, France, and UK, after reports on war crimes and human rights abuses by Saudi-led coalition forces. Yet that doesn’t mean that these three elite nations aren’t getting paid in billions in return for weapons for the Saudis and Emiratis. Human rights aside, money still has the higher ground in the case of Yemen.

Nevertheless, the Houthis and their allies in Sanaa are still producing and improving their military arsenal to repel the Coalition’s attacks in the north, which has been a surprise to the Saudis and a heavy punch that they’re trying to cope with.

 

 

Sanaa-supported Yemen military generals standing in front of newly developed missiles’ replicas

 

In conclusion, the most reliable option here is a total cease-fire in all of Yemen, though it’s hard to practically impose on the warring sides due to the lack of trust between them, yet it will open a door for serious negotiations to put an end to the war, or, to say the least, apply the agreements that have been signed between them in Stockholm last December.

August 27, 2018

المتحدث باسم أنصار الله: التحالف السعودي مع دولة في اليمن تابعة لآل سعود دون أن يكون فيها سلاح وقوة

by mkleit

 

نفى المتحدث باسم أنصار الله، محمد عبدالسلام، وجود أي ثقة بين القوى اليمنية والتحالف السعودي، وأكد على أن اسم عبدربه منصور هادي غير مطروح كشخصية توافقية لأنه “جزء من المشكلة في اليمن.”

وفي مقابلة خاصة مع وكالة يونيوز للأخبار، قال عبدالسلام أن “الثقة معدومة بيننا وبين التحالف السعودي، لذلك يجب ان يكون هناك اتفاق موقع، وهذه المشكلة التي كانت في مفاوضات الكويت، هو أنهم أرادوا اتفاق موقع من طرفنا ولكن هم يعطوننا فقط وعود شفهية.”

وأوضح أن “الحل هو أن يكون هناك اتفاق شامل يوقع عليه جميع الاطراف بحضور دولي وإشهار معلن ويلتزم به الجميع.”

وأشار إلى أنه “في الغرف المغلقة، يطلبون (حكومة الرئيس المنتهية ولايته عبدربه منصور هادي) فقط ما يخصهم، أما في الاعلام يقولون أننا لا نلتزم ولا نريد الحل.”

وفي معرض حديثه عن الرئيس اليمني المنتهية ولايته، عبد ربه منصور هادي، قال عبد السلام أنه “أصبح جزء من المشكلة، فهل من المنطقي أن يكون هذا الشخص الذي قاتل اليمنيين وجلب لهم هذا الشر والويلات أن نعطيه مجدداً هذه الثقة ان يكون رئيساً؟ نحن بحاجة أن نوجد شخص على قبول من كافة الاطراف وهم موجودون، أما أن تأتي السعودية لتفرض عليها عبد ربه منصور هادي فهذا لن يحصل.”

وشدد على أن “منصور هادي لن يستطيع ان يقدم لك الحقوق الذي كان جزء من انتهاكها.”

كما أكد المتحدث باسم أنصار الله، محمد عبدالسلام، أن “السلاح هو موضوع قوة لنا ولن يسمحوا (التحالف السعودي) لنا بأي حضور سياسي”، موضحاً أن السعودية لا تريد دولة قوية في اليمن، بل كيان تابع لها.

واوضح أن “المشكلة في اليمن ليست بالسلاح، لأن التحالف السعودي يدخل السلاح الى اليمن بشكل كبير.”

وقال أن أنصار الله “نؤمن ان السلاح يجب أن يكون بيد الدولة، ولكن من هي هذه الدولة؟ هل الدولة هي التي كانت تقاتلك لأربع سنوات وأدخلت المرتزقة والاجانب لاحتلال البلد؟ هذه ليست دولة.”

وتساءل المسؤول في أنصار الله: “هل قدموا نموذج إيجابي في الجنوب للدولة؟ هناك مجموعات في الجنوب لا تعترف بشرعية منصور هادي ولا تقبله وهناك سلاح بيد داعش والقاعدة وجماعات أخرى، فلا نقبل أن يُختزل موضوع السلاح فينا فقط.”

وشدد عبدالسلام على أن “السلاح هو موضوع قوة لنا ولن يسمحوا لنا بأي حضور سياسي،” مطالباً الطرف الآخر بـ”ناقش أسباب حصول العدوان وانتشار السلاح، ثم قم بإلغاء هذه الأسباب.”

وفي حديثه عن التحالف السعودي، قال عبدالسلام أن “التحالف السعودي مع دولة في اليمن تابعة لآل سعود، دون أن يكون فيها سلاح وقوة (…) لو كنا معهم، لأعطونا أفضل أنواع الأسلحة، فالمسألة ليست في السلاح، بل في القضية التي تتمسك بها والسلاح وسيلة لتحقيقها.”

وأكد المتحدث باسم أنصار الله أن الحل السياسي في اليمن يتمثل بوجودة سلطة توافقية وأن المشاورات القادمة في السادس من أيلول/ سبتمبر في جنيف “يجب ان تضمن حل سياسي يتمثل بالرئاسة والحكومة وبالترتيبات الامنية كمبادئ”.

وفي مقابلة خاصة مع وكالة يونيوز للأخبار، قال عبدالسلام أن “رؤيتنا للحل السياسي هو ان يكون هناك سلطة سياسية متوافق عليها كمؤسسة الرئاسة عبر إنشاء مجلس رئاسي او إيجاد شخصية توافقية، ثم تشكيل حكومة وحدة وطنية تشارك فيها كل الاطراف، ثم ترتيبات امور أمنية وعسكرية بعد انتشار السلاح بيد الجماعات الارهابية المختلفة.”

كما أضاف أن “الطرف الآخر لا ينظر الا لسلاح الجيش اليمني واللجان الشعبية، دون أن ينظر الى سلاح الآخرين، ويجب ان تكون هناك مظلة سياسية تحت سلطة الدولة. كل الاسلحة الثقيلة يجب ان تذهب الى معسكرات الدولة.”

“يتبع ذلك ترتيبات انسانية واقتصادية، متمثلة بمعالجة مخلفات الحرب كالاعمار والتعويضات لأن الحرب تسببت بكوارث بحق الشعب اليمني نتيجة الحصار الذي استمر سنوات،” كما قال عبدالسلام، مشدداً على أن “الحل السياسي يجب ان يضمن هذه الترتيبات.”

وفيما يخص المشاورات المزمع عقدها في السادس من أيلول/ سبتمبر القادم في مبنى الامم المتحدة في جنيف السويسرية، قال المتحدث باسم أنصار الله أن “مشاورات جنيف يجب ان تضمن حل سياسي يتمثل بالرئاسة والحكومة وبالترتيبات الامنية كمبادئ، لأن الامم المتحدة تقول أن التفاصيل يجب أن تذهب الى الحوار السياسي، فنحن لا نمانع ذلك شرط أن لا تُختزل كما حصل في مباحثات الكويت التي كانت شروطها امنية وعسكرية فقط دون أن تكون سياسية كتسليم السلاح والانسحاب دون أن يكون هناك غطاء للدولة.”

كما أشار إلى أنه سيكون هناك وفد وطني موحّد للذهاب الى تلك المشاورات، موضحاً أنه “ربما سيكون هناك بعد المشاورات جلسات للمفاوضات تؤدي الى التزامات مثل وقف التصعيد وفتح مطار صنعاء.”

وعلى صعيد متصل، قال المتحدث باسم أنصار الله، محمد عبدالسلام، أن الأمم المتحدة دورها محدود جداً في اليمن بسبب “الضغط السياسي الامريكي – البريطاني والمال السعودي والاماراتي”، مندداً بغياب محاسبة التحالف السعودي على المجازر التي يرتكبها بحق اليمنيين.

وفي مقابلة خاصة مع وكالة يونيوز للأخبار، أشار عبدالسلام إلى أن “السعودية متغطرسة ولأنها فشلت في الحرب أصبحت متهورة وتهرب الى الامام (…) فارتكب النظام السعودي مجزرة بحق أطفال في حافلة مدرسة في سوق ضحيان وقال أنها متوافقة مع القانون الدولي.”

وأضاف أن “الدعم السياسي للسعودية حماها، كذلك القادم من امريكا وبريطانيا. كما الحال ما حصل في سوريا، قام ترامب ليعلن ضربة ضد سوريا بعد اتهام الاخيرة بقضية الضربة الكيميائية المزعومة، وهي قضية ملتبسة. سوريا نكرت الموضوع واعتبرتها مؤامرة، وأكدت أن جماعات مسلحة لديها اسلحة كيميائية تم تهريبها عبر الحدود، ومع ذلك تم قصف سوريا.”

“اما في اليمن، تمت إدانة المجزرة بشكل جماعي في المجتمع الدولي، ولكن لم يتمكنوا من تمرير لجنة تحقيق لأنه معروف من هو الفاعل،” قال المسؤول في أنصار الله.

وفي حديثه عن المجازر التي ارتكبها التحالف السعودي في اليمن، ومن ضمنها مجزرة الصالة الكبرى وغيرها من مجازر، قال عبدالسلام أنه “لم يتم تشكيل أي لجنة تحقيق دولي، وهي مجازر قامت بها طائرات التحالف بدعم سياسي امريكي.”

وأضاف أن “السعودية تقوم بعملياتها بطائرات وذخائر واستخبارات امريكية، وهي تنفذ فقط ما تُأمر به، ولن تقبل أمريكا بأي تحقيق يدينها (…) كما أن السعودية والامارات وامريكا وبريطانيا يعملون على حماية مصالح اسرائيل.”

وفي معرض حديثه عن دور الامم المتحدة، قال عبدالسلام أن المنظمة الأممية “تلعب بهامش ضيق ولن تخرج من الموقفين الامريكي والبريطاني، والمال السعودي والاماراتي.”

وأعطى مثالا عن المبعوث الدولي السابق لليمن، اسماعيل ولد الشيخ أحمد، حيث وصفه بأنه “كان تابعا للنفوذ السعودي بشكل صريح، وكان يحركه سفير سعودي، وعندما انتهت ولايته أصبح وزيراً للخارجية لنظام يُحرك من قبل السعودية.”

وأكد على أن أنصار الله “لا نراهن على الامم المتحدة لأنها تتحرك فقط عندما يحصل احراج لها من الرأي العام الدولي”، وأعطى مثالا على ذلك قائلا: “لم تستطع الامم المتحدة أن تعطينا رحلة عودة الى صنعاء بعد أن حوصرنا في مسقط لثلاثة أشهر عقب انتهاء مفاوضات الكويت، وتمت إعادتنا بصفقة تبادل مع معتقلين للتحالف.”

%d bloggers like this: