Posts tagged ‘Shiite’

August 23, 2018

For the Bahrainis, Bahrain was Never Independent

by mkleit

Bahrain is passing through what is called in the Arab state as “the week of independence”, where several celebrations occur there in memory of the departure of the British mandate on the 16th of August 1971, yet for the Bahrainis, independence isn’t solely about getting rid of the “White man”, especially with the on-going protests calling for regime change still taking place since 2011.

Bahrain is the smallest Arab state in the Middle East and North African region; it’s situated between the shores of Saudi Arabia and its rival Iran as an archipelago, an extremely strategic one considering its great oil resources that made this small monarchy influential on the world stage.

 

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Bahrain is the smallest Arab state, located in the Persian gulf between two Middle Eastern superpowers Iran and Saudi Arabia

 

 

Like their cousins to the West, the Saudis, the Bahraini monarchs are keen to impose stability to their regime and state, even if it means imprisoning opposition leaders and activists, prosecuting journalists and banning foreign media outlets from entering the country, or lobbying in international conferences and gatherings against their own people, and here the people are the ones who demand regime change.

On the 14th of February 2011, during the globally known “Arab Spring” uprisings, more than half of the 1.4 million Bahrainis took the streets to demand democratic and regime change, as well as socio-economic reforms that include giving just rights for the Shia majority in the country, which make up around 60% of the general dominant Muslim population there.

 

Infograph about Human Rights violations in Bahrain during the month of April 2018 (Arabic)

The Khalifa monarchy that’s ruling Bahrain nowadays has ascended the throne since 1783 during what was called the “Hakimmiyah” era of rule, where Ahmad bin Mohamad bin Khalifa took control of the oil-rich island. It was then transformed to an Emirate rule in 1971, and then a Kingdom in 2002; with all these years being ruled by solely one family, the Khalifas.

Though the current protests (that erupted in 2011) are not the first ones against the monarchy in Bahrain, yet they have taken the fight to a global stage, where several countries and international organizations have condemned the treatment of detainees and oppression of protests in Bahrain, that the opposition has been maintaining peaceful ones so far.

 

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Banner lifted during protest in London against Bahraini authorities’ murder of activists

 

 

The authorities and security personnel, most of whom are non-Bahrainis, with the help of Saudi forces known as “Jazira Shield”, have been brutally detaining activists and journalists like Nabeel Rajab who denounced the Saudi-led war on Yemen on Twitter, imprisoning opposition leaders such as religious cleric Ali Salman, head of al Wifaq organization, which is a prominent opposition front, as well as imposing a siege on Diraz town for over a year after locals blocked the way in front of security forces who wanted to apprehend the Shia’s of Bahraini’s “Pope” Sheikh Issa Kassem.

The siege has rendered Diraz scarce of water supplies and food. It was missing from the world map after several internet blackouts to ban besieged citizens from communicating with the outside world. Above all that, the 81 years old leading Shia cleric’s health deteriorated due to several ailments, while the authorities turned a blind eye to his predicament.

 

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Banner during protest in London against the prosecution of prominent Shia cleric Issa Kassem

 

After several negotiations and the interference of humanitarian parties and international players, Sheikh Kassem was moved to a hospital in London to receive treatment; yet his case was one of thousands of cases where the Bahraini authorities deny those who oppose it the needed medical attention, especially those who are imprisoned there.

One recent example is Hasan Moushayme’, a leading opposition activist in Bahrain in his 70’s, suffering from diabetes and other illnesses, and has been imprisoned for months without receiving proper medical treatment. His son, Ali, has been going through a hunger strike for the past three weeks, demanding proper medical treatment for his father and all of the detainees in Bahraini prisons.

 

 

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Banner during a protest in Bahrain pleaing for the aid of prominent activist Hasan Moushayme’

 

Ali has been attacked by an unknown individual while sleeping during his sit-in in front of the Bahraini embassy in London, and has been witnessing several attempts to bar him from continuing his strike, that also demands granting the detainees their legal and humanitarian rights.

 

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London-based Bahraini activist Ali Moushayme’ during his first days of hunger strike in front of Bahraini embassy in London, demanding medical care to his father and thousands of other prisoners in Bahraini detention centers

 

With all this going on, the UK has been granting “legitimacy” to all of Bahrain’s actions against its citizens proceeding in security training programs and opening a military base in the Arab island. The UK has not condemned the assaults on activists and journalists in Bahrain ever since the uprising erupted in 2011, but money and interest speak louder than human rights violations.

 

 

 

January 4, 2016

Situation in KSA after the Execution of Sheikh al Nimr

by mkleit

Source: unknown

protester-holds-picture-sheikh-nemer-al-nemer-during-rally-coastal-town-qatif-reuters

The situation is quite tense in KSA and in the region, due to the recent development in the political confrontation between Iran & KSA, due to the execution of the cleric Nimer Baqir Al Nimr, who was executed along with others 47 convicted with terrorism charges.

The Saudi authority announced cuts the diplomatic relationships with Iran and evicts Iranian diplomats from KSA within 48 Hours.

Mutable security implications expected in the short term in various locations, including the KSA eastern province, Bahrain and the Yemeni front.
1.    Armed confrontations between the Saudi police and Shiite militant groups in the eastern province.(with a very likely & possibilities of deterioration in the civil unrest condition in these areas).
2.    Armed confrontations between the Bahraini police and Shiite revolts groups in & around the Shiite villages. (Light firearms and improvised Explosive devises are expected to be used by the militant groups).
3.    Wide confrontations between police forces and protesters will be wetness along the areas& village with high Shiite population.
4.    Intensified confrontation between Saudi forces and Ansar Allah (Al Houthi) rabbles along the Saudi Yemeni borders.
5.    Also IS terrorist organization might get involved to benefit from the security & political tense situation by carrying out sectarian attacks against Shiite community to ignite sectarian conflict in the region.

 

February 17, 2013

Bahrain: The Palestine of the Arab Gulf

by mkleit

For those of you who don’t know, this is Bahrain: (feel free to google for more information about the country)

Bahrain is located in the Middle East, it is the smallest Arab country but an influential one with its oil riches
http://ir.blogs.ie.edu

Probably the title may seem as a political opinion, but it’s not. This would be far from a political analysis as much as it would be a humanitarian spread of information.

Bahrain has followed the stream of the so-called “Arab Spring”, though in my personal opinion, it is the only country that is having a true revolution, alongside the protests in Eastern provinces of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA).
The reason for that: Bahrain is only “Arab Spring” country that has minimal news coverage since the 14th of February 2011, the start of its revolution.

For me, it is because of the verity of its peaceful protest and their would be no use for “the higher powers” of a change in Bahrain’s current political system. But if you have checked the outcome of other “Arab Spring” revolution you might realize the following:

  1. Egypt is still in time of turmoil due to “unchanged” regime that has come to their newly formed political system.
  2. Yemen is drowning in political problems that keep on evolving day by day due to tribal collisions and deviation from the original demands of the revolution.
  3. Tunisia, the first spark of the revolutions, are not different from their Egyptian counterparts, where the type of regime is the same, and with the same results as well.
  4. Libya has entered a excruciating civil war that’s tearing the country apart, as well as the great loss in most of its resources after the NATO interference in removing former dictator Muamar Ghaddafi. Libya was concerned a country that could turn all of Africa into a huge green space due to its resources that varied from gold, oil, gas, and water.
  5. Syria is a complex issue. From my own point of view, the first protests were true and honest until it was infiltrated by several terrorist groups that tore several regions of country apart, especially within the opposition itself. The reformation that Syrian president Bashar Assad has done lessened the levels of violence, until the terrorist groups have took over the whole opposition. It’s not weird that you find several central commands for the Syrian opposition; most of them not related to each other, such as the Free Syrian Army (FSA), Syrian National Council, Al-Nusra Front, etc… Media had a huge role in diverting public opinions to be extreme to both pro and anti-regime.

All that, Palestine is still outside the map and witnessed a severe aggression from the zionist entity in its land. To make this all brief and straight forward, “israel” is the only one that’s benefiting from the “Arab Spring”. From the North, there are Lebanon and Syria that are directly affected with the latter’s crisis.

Syria, part of the axis of opposition to “israel”, with Lebanon, Iran, and Palestine. The zionist entity also benefited from Egypt’s turmoil, since the Arab country has a huge weight in the Arab-israeli conflict, due to geopolitical reasons. While as the rest of the Arab countries, fall under colonial benefits for elite nations.

 

Bahrain’s revolution in Photo
http://www.presstv.ir/detail/175357.html

 

But what about Bahrain? Why makes it special apart from all other Arab countries that witnessed revolutions? I’ll tell you why. Bahrain is the only country among the above mentioned that served a peaceful unarmed revolution, yet the regime faced the protests with apprehensions, detainment, preposterous legislation, and death.

Where was the media from all this? Mainstream media in the Arab Gulf is an allied nation by itself and follows the command of the Gulf kings. One Ommani friend once told me in a gathering of Journalists in Amman, Jordan: “You can only praise the king, army, allies, and religion in Arab mainstream media, but not criticize them, or else…”

Or else the king and his allies will either seize your acts, by diplomacy or force, and what’s even worse, diverting public opinion against you. Thus what is happening in the smallest Arab country. Search mainstream media during news broadcasts, only a small number of them would report the Bahraini revolution on a daily basis, those who have a political agenda with the people, such as Al-Alam TV (Iranian), al Manar TV (Lebanese, pro-Hezbollah), Press TV (Iranian), Addonnia (Syrian, pro-government), Itijah TV (Iraqi, Lebanese-based, pro-axis of opposition to “israel”), al-Akhbar newspaper (Lebanese, pro-axis of opposition to “israel”) and few more. On the other side, worldwide media outlets would only mention Bahrain if it’s a global matter such as the F1 competition, Arab Gulf League gathering, or some festival…

And to make things worse, Saudi and Bahraini officials have agreed to send Saudi forces to the Arab island to “preserve peace and harmony”. None of which is being achieved due to the continuous oppression on protesters.

 

Bahrain – Palestine, the wound is one
occupiedpalestine.wordpress.com

 

Why Palestine and Bahrain are sort of similar?

  1. Occupied by foreign forces; the only difference stands is that Palestine is occupied by a religiously-based extremist movement of no nationality, known as zionism, which has an ideology that Palestine and parts of the Arab world are their “promised land”. Bahrain is currently occupied by religiously-based extremist movement of a known nationality, known as Wahabism, which has an ideology of oppressing all what is not Wahabi, regardless if the oppressed was Muslim or not.
  2. International mainstream media ignores the situation of the oppressed and often leans towards the oppressor, that is if the whole situation was reported. While as local Arab media would report Palestine on a daily basis, but not giving it a priority, while as Bahrain is completely marginalized.
  3. Journalists in both countries are being censored or faced with harsh treatment while performing their job.
  4. The stereotype that both countries’ are being oppressed on a secular basis, Palestine because they are Muslims and Bahrain because they are Shiites. This is completely falsified, Palestine is a multicultural society, it has Muslims, Christians, Jews, communists, secularists, and so on. Bahrain’s revolution is based on the collaboration of Shiites with Sunnis, secularists, and communists all together.

I do believe there are several more reasons that correlate with the comparison. God save Bahrain and Palestine. The latter is the mother, and the first is its two-years old child.

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